Archive for curry

Beef Rendang

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There’re so many recipes for rendang around the internet. Some recipes call for liters and liters of coconut milk, some uses loads ginger but no galangal… *this one is a bit strange though*  This is the first time ever I cook rendang as I’m aware it’s so time-consuming and requires certain ingredients that can’t be substitute with any powdered stuff. Like this powdered lemon grass or powdered galangal…..   that’ll never work. Trust me, I’ve been there. Nothing beats the real thing, you know what I mean  😉

Finally I found the one I’m really happy with. The recipe adopted from uni Dewi Anwar –  she has this special recipe using 1 tbs of ground beef liver plus toasted coconut that would surely taste fantastic in rendang. Her secret recipe combined with a few others would be just awesome!  For this recipe I use 1 kg of  beef topside and silverside. Oh, I also found two fresh beef tongue from the same shop in the market. Just beautiful! would be perfect for ox tongue steak the next day. Or perhaps something else yummie….

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 BEEF RENDANG – the real deal from West Sumatra Indonesia

● 1 kg beef topside/silverside – discard fat
● 20 pcs shallot
● 10 pcs garlic
● 3 cm fresh ginger
● 15 pcs red chilies
● 4 cm fresh galangal
● 1/2 tsp coriander seeds
● 2 tsp nutmeg
● 15 pcs red chilies
● salt, pepper, palm sugar to taste
** Process all ingredients into a smooth paste

● 3 pcs star anise
● 2 cm cinnamon stick
● 5-7 pcs kaffir lime leaves
● 3 pcs lemon grass, bruised the stalks
● 1 tbs tamarind
● 2 pcs bay leave
● 3 cups of thick coconut milk (I use dessicated coconut)

Additional seasoning:
● 1 tbs toasted coconut – smoothly ground
● 1 tbs steamed beef liver – smoothly ground
** Mix both ingredients into the gravy

Cooking Directions:
1. Cook beef in ground ingredients + a cup of water in low heat
    until tender
2. Once it’s properly cooked, add coconut milk
    Then add the leafy ingredients
3. If using fresh coconut milk, keep stirring until gravy thickens
4. Add additional seasoning upon serving
5. You can keep on cooking until it turns dark, or the one I prefer
    is just beautifully reddish-yellow almost dry but not so.

Recipe is adopted and slightly modified from Dewi Anwar. Thank you Uni Dewi.

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Screamin’ Hot Vindaloo Curry

 

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Vindaloo Chicken Curry –  as featured on Tastespotting

 

A couple of days ago I did quite a bit of reading and surfing about the curry of the world, to help David, our hotel’s F&B Manager for his “Curry Cooking Class” on Friday. He’s teaching a group of staff who’re interested in the origin of cuisine – and this week’s topic was about curry. I was invited to be the guest speaker actually, which I reclined as I wasn’t really on my top condition to stand up a long time…. being pregnant 😀

However it was an interesting subject and had attention & positive feedback from the staff. Most of them didn’t have the slightest idea of the differences between Thai curry, Indonesian curry, Malay/Sing curry, Japanese curry, Indian curry or Caribbean curry – Thai curry is the most aromatic of all and not as heavy as the Indian ones, while Malaysian/Singaporean usually use belacan/shrimp paste in their curry, while the usage of lemon grass + kaffir lime leaves + galangal + tamarind is  a must in Indonesian curry.

I’m a true curry addict. The one curry dish I can’t make perfectly but I miss so much is Rendang, originally from West Sumatra Indonesia but so often wrongly claimed as Malaysian origin. It requires the freshest ingredients to cook it to perfection. Would be impossible using only dessicated coconut or packaged “Kara” instant coconut milk.

Friends of ours from NZ gave us a can of Vindaloo curry paste from Patak’s. Okay, I may not familiar with the differences of Indian curries but am very familiar with the flavours. I love them. Vindaloo is supposed to be one of the spiciest curry. Next to Phall.

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Patak’s curry paste tastes a bit too mild for me, so I added extra vindaloo paste made from scratch:

 

TRADITIONAL VINDALOO CURRY PASTE

* 15 pcs dried red chilies
* 5 pcs large garlic cloves
* 1 medium onion, diced
* 3 cm fresh ginger, bruised
* 2 tsp pan-roasted cumin seeds
* 1 tsp pan-roasted coriander seeds
* 1 tsp fenugreek seeds
* 10 pcs whole cloves
* 1 tsp cardamom seeds
* 2 inch piece of cinnamon stick
* dried tamarind
* 2 tbsp white wine vinegar

Directions:
1.) Soak dried chilies in hot water overnight. Pureed.
2.) Stir fry onion, garlic & ginger until caramelized
3.) Ground all cumin seeds, coriander, fenugreek & cloves
4.) Add to the cooked onion, add chicken/beef/lamb chunks
5.) Add pureed chilies, cinnamon stick & cardamom seeds
6.) Add 2 cups of water, cover and cook until tender
7.) Add 1 cup of heavy coconut milk

Verdict: this dish is so yummy, moreish but prepare a huge glass of water next to you to douse the fire. Hehehehe

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