Archive for Street Food

Menu Juara: Soto Tangkar Betawi

Also known as Indonesian Beef Ribs Soup. A specialty from Jakarta, the city where I was born and grew up in.  But what does “soto” means?  Have a look ~ here ~ from my previous posting.  Soto Betawi has become a regular menu that keeps popping up every two weeks or so.  The reason is because I like it better than the chicken version and Michael would never say no this this.

I ran out of some ingredients & spices a few weeks ago. Little things like lemon grass, fresh galangal and frozen kaffir lime leaves. Of course you can substitute them with powdered ones if that’s the only option, but you know already, nothing beats the real thing. Even from the moment I started mixing the ingredients, I can tell whether the soto is going to have the correct taste or not from the scent of the cooked ingredients.  Powdered or packaged ingredients usually have a slightly “off’ chemically taste to it – well, only a few very good brands like Munik, tastes almost like the real thing.

This weekend, a friend brought me a new supply of these ingredients from Shanghai. Whoa my gosh! That gift equals with a pouch of gold nuggets to me. No kidding, where can you get these stuff in the middle of a grassland? So here I am, cooking away my favorite recipes once again….


Recipe for Soto Tangkar Betawi
(or Batavian Beef Ribs Soup)  you can have a look  HERE



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Tongseng Kambing


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As featured in  Tastespotting Foodgawker


Remember in my previous posting when I briefly introduced   “Soto” –  one of the many special soup dishes in Indonesia, which is interestingly enough, served as  main dish accompanied by steamed rice or noodles. Unlike in the western cuisine where soup is served as an appetizer. One of the special characteristics of Indonesian soup is the generous usage of fragrant ingredients such as lemon grass, kaffir lime leaves, roasted coriander seeds and galangal – resulting in that special flavours which characterize these “soto”

Soto or Indonesian soup is something you would find sold on street corners & open market vendors. Yups, it’s a street food, quite a famous one. Different provinces in Indonesia has its own distinct flavours.  There’re so  many varieties of  ‘soto’ dish to a point that you could probably make a one month menu from different type of soto. Just kidding! But really, it’s THAT many….

Note on the special ingredients e.g.  kaffir lime leaves, lemon grass, galangal, Indonesian soy sauce.  Most of these ingredients are becoming easier to find in the local asian stores or china town in your country, well I am sure it’s much more easier to find these things over there compared to where I live now in Inner Mongolia.


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TONGSENG KAMBING
or  Indonesian Lamb Cabbage Soup
Ingredients:
*  1 kg of lamb – I added a few pcss of lamb ribs for the flavours
*  1 liter coconut milk (canned or packaged is just fine)
*  1/2 cabbage – roughly chopped
*  4  pcs whole cloves
*  2 pcs red tomatoes, chopped
*  1 stalk of lemon grass – bruised
*  2 cm galangal
*  4 pcs kaffir lime leaves
*  6 pods of cardamoms
*  3 cm cinnamon stick
*  10 pcs red (or bird eye’s) chilies, sliced

Processed (paste) Ingredients:
*  8 pcs shallots
*  6 pcs garlic
*  2 cm fresh garlic
*  5 pcs candlenuts – flame roasted would taste better
*  1/2 tsp  coriander seeds – toasted would taste better
*  1/2 tsp cumin powder

** Optional:  2 tbs of Bumbu Cik Oneh – for a better kick!
untuk yang baru aja dapet stok bumbu dari Pasar Majestik… whoo hooo!

Cooking Directions:
1.)  In a pressure cook, boil lamb in 1 ltr water until tender enough
2.)  Stir fry processed ingredients until fragrant. Add lemon grass
3.)  Mix in the cooked ingredients into lamb pot, add the rest of  ingredients
4.)  Let it cook for a while,  stir in  coconut milk.
5.)  Add chopped cabbage, tomatoes & chilies. Let it cooked through
6.) Ready to serve with warm steamed rice on the side
and sprinkles of fried shallots (bawang goreng)


Note for my fellow SLFers:
Setelah berkali-kali bereksperimen dengan sup & soto shot yang kadang2 anglenya suka rada impossible karena bentuk mangkuk yang kurang ideal, akhirnya ketemu juga dengan  angle yang cukup memuaskan *imho*  Mangkuk yang dipakai kali ini cukup lebar mulutnya & tidak terlalu dalam, hingga isi si soto bisa terlihat, nggak tenggelam dalam kuahnya.  Warna mangkuk juga sengaja dicari yang cheerful untuk menunjang warna soto/sup yang memang cenderung kelihatan ‘dull’ saat  difoto…..   😀


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Soto Kudus


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Soto Kudus ~  Indonesian Chicken Soup, Javanese Style.  “Kudus”  is a city in Central Java, Indonesia.  There’re so many varieties of “soto” or soup from different parts of provinces in Indonesia. This particular one is quite easy to distinguish from its dominant garlicky flavours from generous sprinkles of deep fried garlic, delicious clear chicken soup with a hint of ginger, toasted coriander seeds and squeeze of lemon juice….. 

One of our weekend eat-out with my family when I was a little, was this great little place near Mayestik Market where they served the best Soto Kudus. It’s so good that my family decided to make it a must-stop restaurant  every Sunday afternoon.  The main thing about the whole dining experience is it’s usually served with a plateful of various kind of skewered yummies as side dish – paru goreng, sate usus goreng, sate telur puyuh, perkedel kentang and my favorite one sumsum goreng telur. Important condiment is also a must for me, chili soy sauce mixed with fried garlic.  It adds an entirely different flavours to the soto.

I find this recipe tastes very close to the original Soto Kudus I used to have, and am still crazy about.



 

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SOTO KUDUS
Indonesian Chicken Soup – Kudus Style

Ingredients:
* 6  pcs chicken thighs
*  4 pcs boiled eggs
*  200 gr bean sprouts, soak in hot water 5 mnts
*  celery stalk/spring onion, chopped
*  2 stalks of lemon grass, bruised
*  2 pcs bay leaves
*  3 tbs of  garlic fried to golden yellow color
*  salt, pepper, sugar to taste

Processed ingredients till smooth:
* 6 pcs garlic
* 6 pcs shallots
* 1 tbs roast coriander seeds
* 1/2 tbs cumin
* 6 pcs roast candlenuts
* 4 cm fresh ginger, slightly roasted

 

Cooking Directions:
1.)  Boil chicken in 1 ltr of water, lemongrass & bay leaves till tender
2.) Heat 1 tbs of oil, stir fry processsed ingredients till cooked
3.) Pour into the chicken pot, add salt, pepper, sugar & fried garlic
4.) Set aside and cut chicken into bite size strips
5.) Prepare individual bowls with: steam rice, boiled eggs, bean sprouts
    chicken strips, pour in steaming soup, sprinkle with spring onions
6.) Don’t forget those tasty chili condiment….  whoa yummy!

Chili for Soto:
* 10 pcs bird’s eye chili or red chili – slice thinly
* 2 tbs sweet soy sauce
* slices of indonesian palm sugar (gula jawa)
* 2 tbs fried garlic – smoothen
* sprinkles of lemon juice
(mix them all together)

 

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Tahu Telur Petis Surabaya


Image Hosted by ImageShack.usTofu & bean sprouts doused in special black peanut sauce –
delicacy from East Java   –  as featured in Tastespotting

Tahu Tek Surabaya – or loosely translated as Tofu Bean Sprouts Salad with Black Peanut Sauce – is quite a special dish for East Javanese in Indonesia. As you already know, Indonesians are serious food fanatics. Many would go overboard going to the farthest corner in a small alley tucked away somewhere in a market 2 hrs drive or even further, for the best dish of its kind. Like the best suckling pig in Bali, is at Bu Oka’s behind an old temple of Ubud, or for Tahu Telur Petis Surabaya, the best of its kind is at Pak Ali’s little warung on Dinoyo Street in Surabaya. How I miss home talking about this now ….

But thanks to Mbak Lisa for her recipe, I managed to bring some of the authentic Surabayan flavours to my home in Inner Mongolia. Two packs of petis udang brought from Indonesia are now being put to use. Petis udang is a black shrimp paste, pretty similar to ‘belachan’ or ‘terasi’ but not quite, as it has a stronger pungent scent, richer flavours and slightly moister than their counterpart.

The dish is mostly vegetable based and eggs, except for the peanut sauce which contains some shrimps. I didn’t make it too spicy for Mike and by cooking the peanut sauce seems to take away some of the strong flavours of petis & garlic. Otherwise he wouldn’t touch the thing and I would have to cook something else.

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TAHU TELUR PETIS SURABAYA

Ingredients:
* 1 block of tofu, cubed bite size
* 1 egg whisked
# Whisk the egg with salt, add tofu and spring onion.
# Make a tofu omelette, then cut into bite size

Black Peanut Sauce:
* 2 cups of fried peanut, processed
* 2 pcs fried garlic, minced
* 2 pcs red chili minced
* 2 tsp shrimp paste (petis udang)
* Dark sweet soy sauce (tiny bit only)
* salt, palm sugar to taste
# Cook garlic + chili, add peanut and a cup of water over low heat
# Cook till the sauce change to a thicker brighter reddish color
# Add petis, salt, drizzles of soy sauce. Stir for 1-2 mnts

Serving directions:

Place tofu omelette, then a one-minute blanched of bean sprouts, sprinkles of chopped spring onions, drizzles of black peanut sauce and top with fried shallots. Some krupuks on the side would be nice too

Image Hosted by ImageShack.us“Petis Udang” – special delicacy of Jawa Timur
(East Java) in Indonesia

ALL ABOUT “PETIS” in Indonesian  –  Petis is presumably only made in Indonesia. It’s the real shrimp paste (deep dark color like licorice, not dry at al like terasi or belacan but gooey, stronger & richer flavours great for salad mixing and most East Java dish)


This dish is submitted for JFI – Sprouts Event hosted by Ammalu’s Kitchen. More information to join the event can be viewed on her blog  HERE.


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More Indonesian Recipe using this special delicacy “Petis”
Krengseng Kambing or Stewed Lamb/Goat by Indonesia-Eats Blogspot
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Soto Betawi – Indonesian Soup

 

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I’ve posted the recipe previously in this blog – and two other blogs. I just want to give a different touch to the dish being served with sprinkles of toasted coconut, accompanied by a bowl of steamed rice. The yellow stuff on top of the rice is “Serundeng”  or spicy toasted coconut. I made it from dessicated coconut, sprinkles of palm sugar, ground chilis, a touch of ground dried shrimp and shredded fresh lime leaves. It matches beautifully with the soto.

Soto is another word for Indonesian soup, which usually more fragrant than the normal soup people know, as we would use lemon grass (plus other basic “soto” ingredients) lime leaves and coconut milk. Probably the best beef ribs soup – that is if you like rich oriental spices in your soup combined with a dash of light coconut milk stewed until the ribs are juicy and tender. Roasted candlenuts, fresh galangal, ginger, lemon grass and kaffir lime leaves make this soup so refreshingly different.

 

SOTO BETAWI

Ingredients:
* 400 gram beef ribs
* 1 kg brisket (some bones if you have)
* 2 pcs bay leaves
* 3 stalks of lemon grass – bruised, tied into a knot & dump into pot
* 3 cm fresh galangal – roast in naked flame until fragrant
* 2 cm fresh ginger, sliced
* 3 pcs kaffir lime leaves
* 250 ml coconut milk
* 500 gr potatoe – cubed
* 4 cm cinnamon stick

Ground spices:
* 12 pcs shallots
* 7 pcs garlic
* 5 pcs red chilis
* 8 pcs candlenuts – roast in naked flame till fragrant
* 1 tbs coriander powder
* 1 tsp cumin powder
* 1 tsp white pepper powder
(all ground smoothly, then stir fry in cooking oil until fragrant)

 
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Cooking Direction:

1.) Boil water with lemon grass, roast galangal, bayleaves in a pot &
     cook ribs + brisket until tender. This should take a while.
2.) In the mean time shallow fry cubed potatoes until golden brown
      (this time, I only steamed the potatoes, running out of cooking oil)
3.) When ribs & beef are tender enough, mix in the stir fried
       ground spices, kaffir lime leaves and cinnamon stick.
       Add salt + pepper, and pinch of sugar if needed
4.) Serve steaming hot. Place cubef potatoes first, then the ribs & soup.
       Sprinkle with chopped spring onions, chopped tomatoes

Nothing beats this steaming hot soup and a bowl of warm rice with sprinkles of toasted coconut in the freezing winter like out here in Inner Mongolia  😀
      

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RECIPE for  SERUNDENG  (toasted coconut topping)

Ingredients:
* 200 gr desiccated coconut
* 4 pcs kaffir lime leaves – shred to pieces
* 6 pcs shallots – ground smooth
* 4 pcs garlic – crushed
* 1 tsp powder red chili
* 1/2 tbs powder coriander seed
* 1 tbs palm sugar (gula jawa)
* 1 tbs dried baby shrimp (rebon) – ground smooth
* 2 slices of fresh galangal root
* salt & pepper to taste

Cooking Directions:

1.) Stir fry shallot + garlic in 1 tbs of olive oil until fragrant
2.) Add ground baby shrimp, galangal, coriander
3.) Stir in coconut & mix throroughly. Add sugar, salt, pepper
4.) Keep on low heat, keep stirring, this may take a while
      until the coconut takes the beautiful color of golden light brown.
5.) Some kaffir lime leaves may leave a bitter-ish taste if cooked
       too long, some are just fine.
6.) Serve as topping of the steamed rice, or mix in with the rice

 

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Crispy Fried Wonton

Image Hosted by ImageShack.usDeep fried wontons with sweet chili sauce dipping

 
I never had the need to learn to make fried wonton when I lived in Jakarta. There’s this one place that sells amazingly crispy and yummie fried wonton – although it’s the chicken noodle that’s to-die-for.  You know where it is  😉   Since I live in the mainland, I rarely find any fried wonton, you know, the crispy ones. If there’s one, it would be soaking wet in oil with the flavours I barely recognize. 

I come to one conclusion, the best chinese food is not in the mainland China. It’s in South East Asia. Singapore-Indonesia or Malaysia.  Anyway, this is my first trial to make fried wonton. So simple and makes a great afternoon or evening snacks.

 

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There’re several different versions of the recipe, but I like this one better. I know how it should taste like, at least.

DEEP FRIED WONTONS

 Ingredients:
*  1 packet of wonton wrappers (square ones) from market
*  1/2 pound minced chicken
*  5 pcs of large prawns – minced
*  4 stalks of spring onions – finely chopped
*  2 tbsp of light soy sauce (I use soy sauce for seafood)
*  1 tbsp of oyster sauce
*  1/2 tsp. sesame oil
*  1/2 tsp. sugar
*  1 egg – whisked
*  1 tsp. corn or potato starch
*  salt and pepper to taste
**  Mix them all together

 

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 Cooking Directions:

1.)  Prepare the filling, place about 1 tsp filling in the center of the skin
       Brush egg white to the edges and around the filling
       Seal it tight in a triangle shape, seal the two edge together
       and make a tight pocket
2.)  Repeat until filling is finished
3.)  Heat up oil in a deep heavy skillet over medium heat
4.)  Fry wonton for a few minutes on each side or until golden brown.
5.) Remove and drain oil on paper towels
       Serve with sweet chili dipping

 

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Grilled Fish ala Jimbaran Bali

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One of our favorite dish that we always have whenever we visit Bali. It’s probably the combination of beautiful ambience overlooking a beautiful beach stretched far into the horizon, toes burried in the white sand, fresh coconut juice off the shells and everything else that makes the grilled fish in this Jimbaran Beach  taste beautifully sweet and succulent.

The recipe is modified from Business Bali online. A pretty good recipe, although we can tell there’s a subtle flavour that’s missing. Probably those coconut shell charcoal grill taste. Very possible. I subs red snapper with grouper fish, which is more common here.  *in case you forget, we live in a middle of a grassland  😛 *

 

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IKAN BAKAR ala JIMBARAN
(Grilled Fish ala Jimbaran Bali)

Ingredients:
*  3 tbs toasted coriander seeds
*  1 tsp tamarind paste
*  5 cloves of garlic
*  5 pcs shallots
*  3 pcs red chillies peper
*  5 pcs candlenuts
*  3 cm fresh galangal
*  salt, pepper, bit of sugar
~ mix all this ingredients into a smooth paste

For gilling sauce:
*  4 tbs sweet soy sauce
*  2 tbs cooking oil
*  2 tbs melted butter

Cooking Directions:
1.) Stir fry the smooth paste until fragrant and cooked enough.
     Add 75 ml of water. Marinate the fish in this sauce.
     Leave for a couple of hours or overnight
2.) Prepare hot grill, cook the fish while brushing it
     with the grilling sauce.
3.) Serve with warm steamed rice.

 

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