Archive for Side Dishes

Sate Lilit Bali

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I am so delighted to be invited by Bee from Rasa Malaysia to be a guest blogger on her website featuring Indonesian cuisine.  After a few short discussions, back and forth emails with a foodie blogfriend, Pepy from Indonesia-Eats, we agree to come up with a different concept featuring varieties of a particular dish that’s popular in Indonesia & Asia. So, this would be quite fun to do.

More posting in English, please click here

Indonesia is believed to be the Home of Sate.  Ini katanya Wiki loh, saya taunya kalo di Indonesia sate itu variasinya banyak banget, sampai-sampai beberapa jenis malah saya belum pernah denger sama sekali apalagi nyobain.

Kalo di mainland dan Inner Mongolia sini, jenis satenya simpel tapi macemnya buanyaaaakkk…..  apa juga dibikin sate loh. Dari jenis yang umum spt daging sapi, ayam, babi, kambing, bebek, cumi, ikan, sampai yang khusus jeroan aja, sate lidah bebek, sate jantung bebek, sate usus…..  bumbu dippingnya simple, cuma chili oil, sedikit jinten & szechuan pepper yang bunder-bunder kecil spt merica tapi bisa bikin lidah senut-senut.
More about chinese street food bisa dilihat  DISINI dan   DISINI


Sate is actually claimed as  Indonesian’s national dish,
which reputation can only be matched by “Soto”- Indonesian fragrant soup
( ini sih kata saya…..   😀 )


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SATE LILIT BALI
(Balinese Minced Seafood Sate)

Bali is known as the island of a thousand temple, I think it should be credited for the island of fragrant spices.


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Recipe Sate Lilit Bali

Ingredients:
* 250 gr shrimp – clean, deveined
* 250 gr mackerel – or any firm white flesh fillet
* 50 gr dessicated coconut
* 6 pcs kaffir lime leaves – thinly sliced
* 2 tbs sugar  – can use any sugar, but coconut sugar is better
* red capsicum – tiny cubes for sprinkles
* bamboo skewers or fresh lemon grass may be used

Processed Ingredients:
* 8 pcs shallots
* 2 pcs garlic
* 2 cm galangal or blue ginger
* 2 cm kencur or lesser galangal
* 1 tsp coriander seeds
* 1 cm fresh turmeric
Mince all ingredients until they turn into a smooth paste. DO NOT FRY

Cooking Directions:
1.) Mix both fish & shrimp in food processor until smooth.
Mix in dessicated coconut. Add 3 tbs of thick coconut milk
2.) Add processed ingredients, mix well. Add salt & sugar to taste
3.) If the mixture is still too dry, you may add 1 egg white and a bit of olive oil
4.) Shape the mixture on sate sticks/lemongrass stalk, flatten slightly
5.) Charcoal grill sate until light brown and cooked through


* This article is a collaboration between Cooking Etcetera, Indonesia-Eats and  Rasa Malaysia


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Coconut Prawn Fritters

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As featured in  Tastespotting

Just a little afternoon snack  (and light dinner) I felt like having yesterday. Although I was actually craving for Singaporean Chili Crab. Yups, just not the right season (and country) for that. The prawns I got from the hotel’s kitchen, are from Dalian, I think. Nice to have a little of seafood again after a while…..

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I shouldn’t be posting recipe in details because it’s soooo easy to cook.  Just make sure the prawns are cleaned & deveined, split in the back, marinate shortly in salt, pepper, lemon & garlic, rolled in flour, dipped in lightly whisked white egg, rolled in dessicated coconut.

Deep fried in oil until it turns color to beautiful yellowish. Place on paper towels to soak the remaining oil.
Ready to be devoured with sweet chili sauce dipping…….

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Soto Kudus


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Soto Kudus ~  Indonesian Chicken Soup, Javanese Style.  “Kudus”  is a city in Central Java, Indonesia.  There’re so many varieties of “soto” or soup from different parts of provinces in Indonesia. This particular one is quite easy to distinguish from its dominant garlicky flavours from generous sprinkles of deep fried garlic, delicious clear chicken soup with a hint of ginger, toasted coriander seeds and squeeze of lemon juice….. 

One of our weekend eat-out with my family when I was a little, was this great little place near Mayestik Market where they served the best Soto Kudus. It’s so good that my family decided to make it a must-stop restaurant  every Sunday afternoon.  The main thing about the whole dining experience is it’s usually served with a plateful of various kind of skewered yummies as side dish – paru goreng, sate usus goreng, sate telur puyuh, perkedel kentang and my favorite one sumsum goreng telur. Important condiment is also a must for me, chili soy sauce mixed with fried garlic.  It adds an entirely different flavours to the soto.

I find this recipe tastes very close to the original Soto Kudus I used to have, and am still crazy about.



 

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SOTO KUDUS
Indonesian Chicken Soup – Kudus Style

Ingredients:
* 6  pcs chicken thighs
*  4 pcs boiled eggs
*  200 gr bean sprouts, soak in hot water 5 mnts
*  celery stalk/spring onion, chopped
*  2 stalks of lemon grass, bruised
*  2 pcs bay leaves
*  3 tbs of  garlic fried to golden yellow color
*  salt, pepper, sugar to taste

Processed ingredients till smooth:
* 6 pcs garlic
* 6 pcs shallots
* 1 tbs roast coriander seeds
* 1/2 tbs cumin
* 6 pcs roast candlenuts
* 4 cm fresh ginger, slightly roasted

 

Cooking Directions:
1.)  Boil chicken in 1 ltr of water, lemongrass & bay leaves till tender
2.) Heat 1 tbs of oil, stir fry processsed ingredients till cooked
3.) Pour into the chicken pot, add salt, pepper, sugar & fried garlic
4.) Set aside and cut chicken into bite size strips
5.) Prepare individual bowls with: steam rice, boiled eggs, bean sprouts
    chicken strips, pour in steaming soup, sprinkle with spring onions
6.) Don’t forget those tasty chili condiment….  whoa yummy!

Chili for Soto:
* 10 pcs bird’s eye chili or red chili – slice thinly
* 2 tbs sweet soy sauce
* slices of indonesian palm sugar (gula jawa)
* 2 tbs fried garlic – smoothen
* sprinkles of lemon juice
(mix them all together)

 

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Tahu Telur Petis Surabaya


Image Hosted by ImageShack.usTofu & bean sprouts doused in special black peanut sauce –
delicacy from East Java   –  as featured in Tastespotting

Tahu Tek Surabaya – or loosely translated as Tofu Bean Sprouts Salad with Black Peanut Sauce – is quite a special dish for East Javanese in Indonesia. As you already know, Indonesians are serious food fanatics. Many would go overboard going to the farthest corner in a small alley tucked away somewhere in a market 2 hrs drive or even further, for the best dish of its kind. Like the best suckling pig in Bali, is at Bu Oka’s behind an old temple of Ubud, or for Tahu Telur Petis Surabaya, the best of its kind is at Pak Ali’s little warung on Dinoyo Street in Surabaya. How I miss home talking about this now ….

But thanks to Mbak Lisa for her recipe, I managed to bring some of the authentic Surabayan flavours to my home in Inner Mongolia. Two packs of petis udang brought from Indonesia are now being put to use. Petis udang is a black shrimp paste, pretty similar to ‘belachan’ or ‘terasi’ but not quite, as it has a stronger pungent scent, richer flavours and slightly moister than their counterpart.

The dish is mostly vegetable based and eggs, except for the peanut sauce which contains some shrimps. I didn’t make it too spicy for Mike and by cooking the peanut sauce seems to take away some of the strong flavours of petis & garlic. Otherwise he wouldn’t touch the thing and I would have to cook something else.

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TAHU TELUR PETIS SURABAYA

Ingredients:
* 1 block of tofu, cubed bite size
* 1 egg whisked
# Whisk the egg with salt, add tofu and spring onion.
# Make a tofu omelette, then cut into bite size

Black Peanut Sauce:
* 2 cups of fried peanut, processed
* 2 pcs fried garlic, minced
* 2 pcs red chili minced
* 2 tsp shrimp paste (petis udang)
* Dark sweet soy sauce (tiny bit only)
* salt, palm sugar to taste
# Cook garlic + chili, add peanut and a cup of water over low heat
# Cook till the sauce change to a thicker brighter reddish color
# Add petis, salt, drizzles of soy sauce. Stir for 1-2 mnts

Serving directions:

Place tofu omelette, then a one-minute blanched of bean sprouts, sprinkles of chopped spring onions, drizzles of black peanut sauce and top with fried shallots. Some krupuks on the side would be nice too

Image Hosted by ImageShack.us“Petis Udang” – special delicacy of Jawa Timur
(East Java) in Indonesia

ALL ABOUT “PETIS” in Indonesian  –  Petis is presumably only made in Indonesia. It’s the real shrimp paste (deep dark color like licorice, not dry at al like terasi or belacan but gooey, stronger & richer flavours great for salad mixing and most East Java dish)


This dish is submitted for JFI – Sprouts Event hosted by Ammalu’s Kitchen. More information to join the event can be viewed on her blog  HERE.


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More Indonesian Recipe using this special delicacy “Petis”
Krengseng Kambing or Stewed Lamb/Goat by Indonesia-Eats Blogspot
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Crispy Fried Wonton

Image Hosted by ImageShack.usDeep fried wontons with sweet chili sauce dipping

 
I never had the need to learn to make fried wonton when I lived in Jakarta. There’s this one place that sells amazingly crispy and yummie fried wonton – although it’s the chicken noodle that’s to-die-for.  You know where it is  😉   Since I live in the mainland, I rarely find any fried wonton, you know, the crispy ones. If there’s one, it would be soaking wet in oil with the flavours I barely recognize. 

I come to one conclusion, the best chinese food is not in the mainland China. It’s in South East Asia. Singapore-Indonesia or Malaysia.  Anyway, this is my first trial to make fried wonton. So simple and makes a great afternoon or evening snacks.

 

Image Hosted by ImageShack.us* as featured in Tastespotting and Foodgawker

 

There’re several different versions of the recipe, but I like this one better. I know how it should taste like, at least.

DEEP FRIED WONTONS

 Ingredients:
*  1 packet of wonton wrappers (square ones) from market
*  1/2 pound minced chicken
*  5 pcs of large prawns – minced
*  4 stalks of spring onions – finely chopped
*  2 tbsp of light soy sauce (I use soy sauce for seafood)
*  1 tbsp of oyster sauce
*  1/2 tsp. sesame oil
*  1/2 tsp. sugar
*  1 egg – whisked
*  1 tsp. corn or potato starch
*  salt and pepper to taste
**  Mix them all together

 

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 Cooking Directions:

1.)  Prepare the filling, place about 1 tsp filling in the center of the skin
       Brush egg white to the edges and around the filling
       Seal it tight in a triangle shape, seal the two edge together
       and make a tight pocket
2.)  Repeat until filling is finished
3.)  Heat up oil in a deep heavy skillet over medium heat
4.)  Fry wonton for a few minutes on each side or until golden brown.
5.) Remove and drain oil on paper towels
       Serve with sweet chili dipping

 

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“Martabak” – meat pancake asian style

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Martabak or murtabak is a popular street food which is probably originated from the arab culture – which is also popular in Saudi Arabia, India, Indonesia, Singapore, Malaysia & Brunei.  Although I swear I’ve seen a different variety of “martabak” sold on the street corners in China.  The chinese version of martabak is using solely chopped spring onions as fillings, slightly smaller in size, using soft pancake instead of crispy outer layers.

So martabak is more like a late afternoon/evening snacks. Mind you, we Indonesians, love snacking so much that there’re so many varities of snack food for different times of day. If you’re lucky enough to see the martabak seller “in action” when he’s carefully stretching a lump of dough into a huge thin skin to cover the entire wok. I always love a good show before my meal anyway 😀

While the dough is frying in oil, he will whip up the fillings – eggs, cooked minced meat/lamb, chopped leeks/spring onions, pinch of this and that. He will then spread the fillings into the dough, fold the dough into a square, flip it. Before you know it, you have a plate of warm martabak cut into bite size squares with divinely crispy layers.

A few weeks ago, David mentioned about his new discovering of this “absolutely yummy” mongolian pancake. When he described it in detail, I thought it sounds so familiar with Indonesian martabak. Hey, maybe I should try making one, didn’t look too difficult….

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Verdict:  this is such a hard work! least for me. The dough can’t be stretched thin enough, although the pancake turned out to be quite crispy. I don’t think I’d want to make it too often.  Pls excuse the photo too, tough to get the perfect angle….  I hate it!

** Recipe source: Sexy Chef – makasih mbak Rieke!

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Maroccan Dinner

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Tonight is our movie night at home. After work, David would usually come to join us for dinner and bring some new dvds with him. Mike will take care of the wine, while I usually stay in the kitchen until the last minute before the food is served.  He has seen Sex & The City five times already but still kept talking about it and wanted us to see that particular movie with him, again, tonight.

While Michael was pouring us wine, I was juggling between slow-cooking spicy bbq pork ribs and grilling them, roasting maroccan stuffed tomatoes and heating the broth for soto ayam as the side dish, which made a perfect accompaniment for the lemony couscous.

The Maroccan stuffed tomatoes is pretty much my own concoction inspired by the Mexican Stuffed Bell Peppers. Have you had those before? Those are amazing stuff. Wait until you try this. I was thinking of Maroccan’s Kefta (Kebab) stuffed into tomatoes. Strong flavours of maroccan spices blending in nicely with the tender minced beef and complemented by the refreshing tanginess of the oven-roasted tomato. Then a spoonful of couscous with a hint of lemon will redefine the flavours all over again.

 

MAROCCAN STUFFED TOMATOES

Ingredients:
* 4 pcs large firm red tomatoes, cored & discard seeds
* 250 gram lean minced beef
* 1 medium onion, chopped
* 2 tbs bread crumbs
* pinch of fresh spring onions, chopped
* pinch of fresh cilantro, chopped
* 1 egg
* 2-3 tbs of Maroccan Seasoning (add more if you like stronger taste)
* 3 pcs red chilies, chopped (optional)
* salt, pepper, sugar to taste

Cooking Direction:
1.) Heat the skillet, few drops of oil & cook onion until fragrant
2.) Stir in minced beef, cook until change color
3.) Add spring onions, cilantro, chilies & maroccan seasoning.
4.) Stir in egg & bread crumbs. Add more crumbs if necessary
5.) Arrange tomatoes in oven proof dish, stuff them with fillings
6.) Roast tomatoes for 20-30 mnts, sprinkle top with
     bread crumbs, roast till they turn light yellow

 

COUSCOUS

This must be the easiest thing to make. Just follow the steps on the packaging box
Add a twist of lemon, some salt and sprinkle with finely chopped cilantro

** Original Recipe by Dhita

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click on the name to participate in the event.

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